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The Sloan Masters Program originated in 1930 when Alfred P. Sloan, Jr., the then CEO of General Motors, realized that the company’s engineers weren’t really management savvy. He contacted MIT’s Erwin H. Shell, who proposed a business education program for promising engineers. Thus the MIT Sponsored Fellowships program was born, later to be renamed the MIT Sloan Fellows Program, to honour the legendary GM leader. The Sloan program expanded to Stanford in 1957 and eventually to London in 1968.

Three-way advantage

In the following decades, the program was expanded to include the Sloan Master’s at the Stanford Graduate School of Business and the Sloan Master’s at London Business School. In 2013, Stanford changed the name of its Sloan Masters Program to Stanford MSx (Master of Science in Management for Experienced Leaders), though participants in the program remain Stanford Sloan Fellows.

As far as 12-month, MBA-like experiences go, the Sloan Programs are the most prestigious and elite business degrees in the world. That’s partly because of the outstanding reputation of the three schools that run these programs, as well as the fast-track executives they attract. But it’s also a function of the highly successful list of Sloan Fellow alums who have reached the top of their organizations over the years.

Given the relatively small size of the three graduating classes each year (at roughly 250 total, it’s less than a third of Harvard Business School’s annual MBA output), it’s astonishing how many of the corporate elite have a Sloan Fellowship on their resumes, from Ford Motors’s CEO Alan Mulally to Aetna Chairman Ron Williams. The former chief executives of Hewlett-Packard, Boeing, Caterpillar, Siemens, BellSouth and Eastman Kodak all are Sloan Fellows, too.

Sloan Masters Program vs an MBA Program

Sloan Masters Programs are neither Executive MBAs, nor MBAs. Unlike most EMBA programs, they are full time. Many Sloan Fellows live on campus and take a hiatus from their careers during the program. Unique from the MBA, the Sloan program targets experienced managers with proven workplace success; most bring at least 10 years of professional experience to the table. The Sloan program is also for just a year instead of two.

The table below shows a comparison between a typical top 10 global MBA program and the Sloan Masters program:

Typical top 10 MBA program Sloan Masters program
Duration Full-time, 2-year Full-time, 1-year
Average work experience 4-year 13-year, 8-year minimum
Average age 25 – 30 30 – 45
Non-US students 40% 60%
Class size between 400 and 1000 between 50 and 110
Degree MBA MSc in Management (except MIT, which offers MBA too)
GMAT influence on acceptance High Medium
Work experience influence on acceptance High High

A typical Sloan Fellow profile

The profile for Sloan Fellows is fairly consistent across all three programs – experienced, talented individuals with stellar business and academic credentials. Stephen Sacca, Director of the MIT Sloan Fellows Program, has been quoted as saying that if candidates accepted in global MBA programs are type A personalities, then the Sloan Fellows class consists of double A personalities. Linden Selby, the senior admission manager for LBS’s Sloan program, describes candidates as “capable, curious and open-minded.”

The table below shows a comparison between the London Business School,  MIT and Stanford Sloan Fellows Programs.

MIT School of Management Stanford Graduate School of Business London Business School
Program Name MIT Sloan Fellows Program in Innovation and Global Leadership Stanford Sloan Masters Program London Business School Sloan Masters Program in Leadership & Strategy
Degree MBA, MS in Management, MS in Management of Technology MS in Management MS in Leadership & Strategy
Tuition USD 126, 500 USD 112, 100 USD 78, 719
Minimum Work Experience required 10 years 8 years 12 years
Average Work Experience 14 years 11 years 16 years
Countries represented 34 26 23
% of Women students 22% 23% 13%
% of International students 75% 77% 18%
International trips as part of curriculum Three compulsory trips ( Silicon Valley/San Francisco, New York City, global trip) One Compulsory (US East coast) and 2 optional (Northwest US and global trip) Week long compulsory global trip and multiple optional trips to Europe
Core Courses
  • Accounting
  • Economics
  • Business Ethics
  • Global Finance
  • Strategy
  • Strategy and Pricing
  • Marketing
  • Operations
  • Leadership
  • Data and Decisions
  • Negotiations
  • Organization Design
  • Organizational Behavior
  • Accounting
  • Economics
  • Ethics
  • Finance
  • Competitive Strategy
  • Marketing Management
  • Operations
  • Strategy Beyond Markets
  • Data and Decisions
  • Negotiations
  • Organization Design
  • Organizational Behavior
  • Corporate Governance
  • Corporate Finance
  • Global Business Environment
  • Executive Leadership
  • Management Accounting for Performance Measurement
  • Managing People and Organisations
  • Marketing
  • Strategy
  • Understanding Top Management
  • Biography
Electives More than 80 elective courses offered under:

  • Accounting
  • Economics
  • Finance
  • Management Science and Operations
  • Technology Management
  • Equity Financing
  • Marketing
  • Organisational Behaviour
  • Strategy and Entrepreneurship
More than 100 elective courses offered under the broad specializations of:

  • Effective leadership
  • Global economics
  • Supply chains
  • Financial markets
  • Management of Technology
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Sustainability
  • Social responsibility
More than 70 elective courses offered under:

  • Accounting
  • Economics
  • Finance
  • Management Science and Operations
  • Marketing
  • Organisational Behaviour
  • Strategy and Entrepreneurship

 

So, if you are a senior manager targeting global leadership positions, the Sloan Masters programs are a good fit for you. Whether you are taking on a C-suite role, changing industry or setting up a new business, Sloan will give you the skills and drive to exceed your goals and network with an exceptional peer group.

 

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